George Floyd: New York and Washington are looking at security flexibility


Security measures have been lifted in the United States over the death of African-American George Floyd in police custody.


New York has ended its nearly week-long curfew, and President Donald Trump has ordered the National Guard to withdraw from Washington, DC.

This unrest has been compounded by a worldwide peaceful protest against racism and police brutality.

Black Lives Matter's protests in European countries also continued on Sunday.

Protesters in the city of Bristol, Britain, have demolished the statue of Edward Colston, a famous 17th-century slave trader.

George Floyd died in police custody in Minneapolis on May 25th. In the video, she was pinned to the ground, with a white police officer kneeling on her neck for nine minutes.

Officer Derek Chauvin was dismissed and charged with murder. Three other officers at the scene were also dismissed, charged with aiding and abusing them.

Mr. Floyd's funeral was scheduled for Tuesday before moving to his hometown of Houston, Minneapolis.

Two senior aides told Reuters News that American Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden will travel to Texas on Monday to meet with Mr. Floyd's family and offer condolences. He did not think he would attend the funeral.

Biden said on Twitter in response to Trump's protests on Sunday that he "used his words as president" to incite violence, incite hatred and divisive flames.

Hours ago, President Trump tweeted that "everything is in perfect control" and that the National Guard may begin to deviate from the capital.


"They're going home, but they can come back quickly if needed. Very few protesters showed up last night than they did at!" He said, \

The National Guard is a reserve military force that may require the US president or state governors to intervene in domestic emergencies.

Trump's previous threats to use military force against protesters have led to a wave of criticism from high-ranking military officials, including his former secretary of defense, Jim Mattis.

On Sunday, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Colin Powell added his voice to CNN, accusing the president of "drifting" out of the constitution. Mr. Powell, who led the U.S. Army during the Gulf War, said he would vote for Mr. Biden.

Responding on Twitter, President Trump called Mr. Powell an "exaggerator" and pointed to his involvement in the 2003 US-led invasion of Iraq.

General Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, led by Barack Obama, told ABC's The Week that the president's words hurt the relations between the American people and the military.


Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice told CBS News 'Face the Nation' that Mr. Trump wants to "tweet a little differently" and communicate with the American public.

Washington has protested angrily outside the White House, particularly as protesters were cleared last Monday to allow Mr. Trump to visit a nearby church.

Wide marches were held peacefully in the capital on Saturday.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted: "We are getting rid of the curfew. It will come into effect immediately. Yesterday and last night we saw a lot in our city."

The end of the curfew comes one day before the first phase of the New York reopening plan comes after lockdown of more than two months due to a coronavirus outbreak.



"Tomorrow we will take the first big step to start remarketing. Be safe. Look at each other," Mr de Blasio said.

New York has seen its fair share of violence over the past week, with robberies of luxury shops in Manhattan, arrests and the burning of dozens of police cars.

Police have also been charged with hitting protesters. The patrolling car was also driven by a crowd of protesters leading to a row between politicians.

Many major US cities have seen unrest, and now lifted the curfew, including San Francisco and Los Angeles, although some protests have led to clashes.

Where are the protests now?
The Black Lives Matter banner was staged across Europe on Sunday.

In Madrid, thousands of people followed coronavirus acts wearing anti-racist placards and masks, but the pictures showed that social differences were not practiced. Outside the US Embassy in Madrid, protesters chanted, "I am not shy." Echo of Floyd's Last Words.

In the Hungarian capital, Budapest, an official took Mr. Floyd's neck and took him to his knees.

There were similar protests in Rome, and the protesters fell silent while George Floyd was pinned down.

There have also been incidents in Brussels, Copenhagen, and many other places in the UK.

What happened on Saturday?
There have been large peaceful rallies across America.

Thousands of people gathered in Washington DC in the city's largest protests at the newly named Black Lives Matter Plaza outside Lafayette Park.

Mass protests were also held in San Francisco, Chicago, and Los Angeles.

It was also protested in the small, eastern Texas town of Vidor, which was once a Ku Klux Klan stronghold.

Dozens of white and black protesters carrying the banner of Black Lives Matter are already in what is known as "Sundown Town" because blacks do not venture out after dark.

Where are the protests now?
The Black Lives Matter banner was staged across Europe on Sunday.

In Madrid, thousands of people followed coronavirus acts wearing anti-racist placards and masks, but the pictures showed that social differences were not practiced. Outside the US Embassy in Madrid, protesters chanted, "I am not shy." Echo of Floyd's Last Words.


In the Hungarian capital, Budapest, an official took Mr. Floyd's neck and took him to his knees.

There were similar protests in Rome, and the protesters fell silent while George Floyd was pinned down.

There have also been incidents in Brussels, Copenhagen, and many other places in the UK.


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